US stocks falter, on track for fourth monthly loss this year

A person wearing a protective mask walks past an electronic board displaying Japan's Nikkei 225 index on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 in Tokyo.  Stocks fell Wednesday in Asia after another broad decline on Wall Street as markets remain plagued by uncertainty over inflation, rising interest rates and the potential for a recession.  (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

A person wearing a protective mask walks past an electronic board displaying Japan’s Nikkei 225 index on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 in Tokyo. Stocks fell Wednesday in Asia after another broad decline on Wall Street as markets remain plagued by uncertainty over inflation, rising interest rates and the potential for a recession. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

PA

Stocks oscillated between gains and losses on Wall Street on Wednesday, keeping the market on track for its fourth monthly loss this year.

The S&P 500 was down 0.2% at 12:09 p.m. The benchmark has been volatile all week and is down 20% for the year as investors worry about inflation and the rising interest rates.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 27 points, or 0.1%, to 30.974 and the Nasdaq fell 0.4%.

Bed Bath & Beyond plunged 19.9% ​​after announcing a much bigger loss than analysts expected and replacing its CEO.

The government said the economy contracted at an annual rate of 1.6% in the first three months of the year, its third and final estimate of GDP in the first three months of 2022. This figure was in line with previous estimates, and economists expect growth. resume later this year.

Investors are watching economic data closely as they try to gauge how much inflation is hurting consumers and businesses, while keeping tabs on the Federal Reserve’s aggressive move to raise interest rates.

The central bank is raising rates in an effort to slow economic growth enough to temper inflation, but Wall Street is wary that the Fed could go too far and push the economy into a recession. Those concerns were heightened by a series of reports showing slowing retail sales and other indicators.

Ongoing supply issues and a surge in demand as the pandemic waned triggered a spike in inflation. It worsened over the year as supply chain issues worsened following new lockdowns in China to help control COVID-19 cases. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February drove up energy prices and led to record gasoline prices that ate at consumers’ pocketbooks.

Consumers have shifted spending from discretionary items like electronics to basic necessities as inflation rises. A weaker-than-expected consumer confidence reading on Tuesday revealed that continued high inflation was making Americans more pessimistic about the present and the future.

The impacts of shifting spending are front and center for investors as companies begin to report their latest financial results. Cheerios maker General Mills rose 6.2% after announcing strong financial results and giving investors encouraging guidance.

Healthcare companies have gained ground. Eli Lilly rose 1.6%. Industrial companies and retailers fell. FedEx fell 3.3% and Target 1.7%.

The 10-year Treasury yield slipped to 3.10% from 3.20% on Tuesday night.

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